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Sue Black confronts death every day As Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Anthropology she focuses on mortal remains in her lab at burial sites at scenes of violence murder and criminal dismemberment and when investigating mass fatalities due to war acciden. I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review I m yet again finding it difficult to organise my thoughts surrounding this book It s an intense sometimes clinical portrayal of death in a very pragmatic and scientific way It s eual parts cold and without feeling in its descriptions of death yet also simultaneously deeply emotive and moving I found that at times I had to step away from it because although fascinating I found myself becoming too attached to the cases I m also deeply in awe of the author s knowledge enthusiasm and respect for the subject she teaches This is a very personal look at the many faces of death as described by one of Britain s leading forensic anthropologists and covers everything from the various ways a body can be buried or preserved what happens to a body after death and how forensic anthropologists can establish any number of things about an individual from their remains It also goes into detail about various interesting cases the author has been directly involved with and how forensics have helped to build a case or resolve a mystery surrounding an individual s death or that of a major disaster It was these chapters I found the most interesting as it builds on knowledge the reader takes from earlier chapters I do think it helped that I have an anthropologicalmedical background however as some of the terms used are uite medical in nature The book also documents the author s time spent in Kosovo and some of the atrocities witnessed there I think it was these chapters that effected me the most deeply as the descriptions of some of the scenes Sue Black is involved with are simply horrendous However it again highlights the invaluable work undertaken within the profession I suppose I was less taken with the small sections near the beginning of the book that seemed to be like a familial memoir or history rather than delivering facts and experiences Although there was always a reason for them such as a device to further expand the readers understanding of various biological processes etc I just wasn t that taken with them in comparison to the later chapters That said I really enjoyed this It was informative well written and interesting As Sue Black herself states humans cannot fail to be affected by the stories of other humans and when you ve lead a life as full as this it s hard not to agree Read it You won t be disappointed

summary Ø eBook, ePUB or Kindle PDF ✓ Sue Black

All That Remains A Life in Death

T or natural disaster In All that Remains she reveals the many faces of death she has come to know using key cases to explore how forensic science has developed and what her work has taught her Do we expect a book about death to be sad Macabre Sue’s book. I m not going to lie but this book made my spine tingle profusely A book based on the matter of death probably shouldn t excite and intrigue a being as much as it has but that day earlier this year when I bought this book in Waterstones I had my Mum with me at the time and although we have similar tastes she has been known to raise that right eyebrow at some of mineSue Black had me hooked from the first page and hell that woman can write Black writes truthfully and sometimes painfully but it all has a profound impact on the reader and that is what has made this an amazing read Does death frighten me No but I can t say I m ready to throw in the towel just yetBlack is a Forensic Anthropologist and a professor at Dundee University and is obviously an expert in her work and it is clear that she holds a passion for what she does It fascinates me and I m always hungry for information on this subject but when push comes to shove I don t think I could do that kind of work day in day out It takes a certain individual I think which is the same with many professionsSue Black has been involved with scenes of mass fatalities and identifying people along with the causes of their death What surprises me is that she can walk into an area where there are many fatalities including women and children who have been through needless suffering but she is scared shitless of rats Even the toughest of individuals are only human Black recalls her life and how she came into the profession and here we learn about her parents and her Father s suffering with what we know today as dementia The way in which she described this time in her life had of an impact on me that I had expected I lost my Nan to dementia and it was a long painful five years that she endured it until she died peacefully in hospital next to my Mum I can definitely relate to that pain It is a dreadful disease Black seems to enjoy the dead than the living and investigating mutilated limbs is her icing on the cake She likes a challenge and appears to have never turned one down and to me she is an inspiration She is able to give people peace especially when it is a murder enuiry and the family wish to know what events unfolded at that time That takes a certain skill and that is admirable I m so glad that I got around to reading this difficult but powerful read and I would definitely recommend it as I think it might surprise people at just how interesting death and all the science surrounding it actually is

Sue Black ✓ 8 read

Is neither There is tragedy but there is also humour in stories as gripping as the best crime novel Our own death will remain a great unknown But as an expert witness from the final frontier Sue Black is the wisest most reassuring most compelling of guide. Reading memoirs by people I have never heard of before is something I very much enjoy The thought that each and every human being on this planet is leading their own life which is uniue and distinct from all others is an unfathomable idea and yet so fascinating This particular memoir is written by Sue Black who is a Scottish professor of forensic anthropology and anatomy Through her field of expertise Sue finds herself confronted with death all the time In All That Remains she tells her readers what death has taught her what impact her work has had on her as a person and does this through a number of actual cases she has dealt with At first I was hesitant with this book because there is just no way around it that death is a topic that easily gets gruesome But this book turned out to be so much intriguing than I could have guessed up front What impressed me most is that Sue s warm personality is clearly present from beginning to end You get to know her as a loving mother a no nonsense woman and she never fails to keep in mind morality Reading this book is like watching your favorite crime series only much down to earth and realistic Just as thrilling because Sue has experienced a fair share of ghastly situations but shows you the relevance of her work and why respectful treatment is important My rating for this book is 375 out of 5 stars This book is perfect for you if you are an avid true crime reader who is looking to expand their interest in the non fiction genre I received a digital review copy of this book from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review All opinions are entirely my own My review is susceptible to changes in the final copy of this work


10 thoughts on “All That Remains A Life in Death

  1. says:

    I've read over 100 pages I've learned all about the author's teenage years working as a Saturday girl in a butcher's shop about her grandfather's death and her uncle Willie's And I am bored Worse I am totally irritated by the extreme and extended characterisation of death as 'She' whom we should get to know better so we can understand her José Saramago did this brilliantly in All the Names where she Death was a fully fledged character and

  2. says:

    A few years ago I saw that Desert Island Discs was interviewing Sue Black Professor of Anatomy and Forensic Pathology at t

  3. says:

    I received a copy of this book in exchange for an honest review I’m yet again finding it difficult to organise my thoughts surrounding this bo

  4. says:

    I'm not going to lie but this book made my spine tingle profusely A book based on the matter of death probably shouldn't excite and intrigue a being as much as it has but that day earlier this year when I bought this book in Waterstones I had my Mum with me at the time and although we have similar tastes she has been known to raise that right eyebrow at some of mineSue Black had me hooked from the first page and hell t

  5. says:

    in striving to stay alive for as long as possible at all costs all we are doing is in fact prolonging our dyingSue Black`s All That

  6. says:

    A mixture of Mary Roach's Stiff and Being Mortal by Atul Gawande this book discusses the author's personal interactions with the dead but also what her work has taught her about what it means to be alive This book is deeply poignant and Black writes very emotionally about humanity but very scientifically about the field of forensic anthropology It's beautifully done

  7. says:

    It's fascinating to read about Sue Black's work The book is written well which makes most of it interesting to the lay person as well How I wi

  8. says:

    Reading memoirs by people I have never heard of before is something I very much enjoy The thought that each and every human being on this planet is leading their own life which is uniue and distinct from all others is an u

  9. says:

    As is probably well established by now I love medical nonfiction so I was excited to pick this book up especial

  10. says:

    Briefly fascinating powerful and very well written Without uestion this will be one of my best books of the yearIn fullSue Black Professor is probably the country's leading expert in forensic anthropology In this book she looks at her life in death This is in part biography and in part an exploration of cases and events