Aldous Huxley [Pdf ebook] Brave New World – TXT & Kindle eBook



10 thoughts on “Brave New World

  1. says:

    I need to parse my rating of this book into the good or great the bad and the very fugly because I thought aspects of it were inspired genius and parts of it were dreggy boring and living near the border of awful In the end the wowness and importance of the novel's ideas as well as the segments that I thoroughly enjoyed carried the book to a

  2. says:

    Warning The following review contains humor If you read it and actually think that I'm being critical of Huxley try reading it again Here's a h

  3. says:

    Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World in 1932 That's almost eighty years ago but the book reads like it could have been written yesterday especia

  4. says:

    Wow the anger over this rating My first post for this book was a uote and a gif of Dean from Supernatural rolling his eyes and passing out And people were pissed How dare I?Lol I'm honestly just so tired of all the dumb com

  5. says:

    “But I don't want comfort I want God I want poetry I want real danger I want freedom I want goodness I want sin” These are words uttered in the face of tyranny and complete oppression though they are very rare words to be spoken or even thought of in this world because every human passion and sense of creativity is repressed and eradica

  6. says:

    remember that last semester of english class senior year where every class seemed painfully long and excrutiatingly pointless? when everybody sat around secretly thinking of cute and witty things to put in other people's yearbooks? wh

  7. says:

    649 Brave New World Aldous HuxleyBrave New World is a dystopian novel by English author Aldous Huxley Published i

  8. says:

    This set the stage about what a dystopian story should be or not be “But I don't want comfort I want God I want poetry I want real danger I want freedom I want goodness I want sin”First published in 1932 this is timeless and is as relevant today as when it was first written Sixteen years before Orwell's 1984 but eleven years a

  9. says:

    As a teenager I went through a period of reading a vast number of distopian novels probably all the teenage angst This is the one that has continued to haunt me however long after the my youthful cynicism has died it's dea

  10. says:

    This book presents a futuristic dystopia of an unusual kind Unlike in Orwell's 1984 Huxley's dystopia is one in which everyone is happy However they are happy in only the most trivial sense they lead lives of simple pleasures but lives without science art philosophy or religion In short lives without deeper meaning Although people are expe

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Ically modified citizens and an intelligence based social hierarchy the novel anticipates huge scientific advancements in reproductive technology sleep learning psyc. But I don t want comfort I want God I want poetry I want real danger I want freedom I want goodness I want sin These are words uttered in the face of tyranny and complete oppression though they are very rare words to be spoken or even thought of in this world because every human passion and sense of creativity is repressed and eradicated through a long and complex process of conditioningAnd that s what makes this novel so powerful it s not unbelievable Like Orwell s 1984 and Atwood s The Handmaid s Tale there s just enough truth within Brave New World for it to be real It s a cruel mirroring of our own existence should we follow a certain path too strongly And that s the wonder of speculative fiction though unlike the other two books there s no violence involved in Huxley s world It s just as controlling and scary but it s done in a indirect way Sex is on tap everybody should be happyPeople don t go missing in the night nor are they stoned to death by a group of their peers but they have just as little freedom even if they don t realise it In this dystopia they are trained from birth to think and feel in a certain way and for whatever reason should they ever deviate from their ordained path they are fed drugs that induce happiness and serenity thus the populace is kept within their desired space and persist with the tasks they were born to do Very few of them even consider that this is wrong this is all they have known And to make things even maniacally clever all physical and sexual needs are fulfilled completely as everybody belongs to everybody else in every sense with the ultimate goal of people never developing desire All desire should be fulfilled nobody wants for anything else People are machines and houses are factories They are mass produced and designed to be one thing and one thing only All values are inverted The idea of showing any emotion is horrific and repulsive Love is unknown and alien Death is associated with sweetness and relief Children are fed candy when they are thought about death so they associate the two together so when as adults they see death they think of treats rather than the loss of someone they have known and worked beside for years In Brave New World people are husks empty and detached without ever realising it John the savage as he enters the new worldI can only admire and praise Huxley s genius through the writing Like all effective dystopian societies reading and information plays an exceedingly important role As with Ray Bradbury s Fahrenheit 451 all books have been destroyed and made inaccessible John one of the few characters who was born away from the new world stumbles across a volume of Shakespeare and it changes his life He can only think and feel in Shakespearean language and begins to view the world through a semi romantic lens and only finds depravity when he walks into the new world It s everything he hates He has been termed the savage though he knows and understands the real meaning of the term even if those who call him such do not Naturally he becomes depressed and isolated in this new space a space that he cannot be a part of or accepted in not that he would want to be And I found him by far the most interesting and compelling character within the story because he is the only one to really look beyond the boundaries of his own experience and to find it wanting So this is a terribly important novel and I can t believe I have only just read it If you haven t read it already you know what you have to do This isn t something to be missed It s a novel that made me think and imagine in a way a book hasn t done in uite some timeYou can connect with me on social media via My Linktree duplicity years In Brave New World people are husks empty and detached without ever realising it John the savage as he enters the new worldI can only admire and praise Huxley s genius through the writing Like all effective dystopian societies reading and information plays an exceedingly important role As with Ray Bradbury s Fahrenheit 451 all books have been destroyed and made inaccessible John one of the few characters who was born away from the new world stumbles across a volume of Shakespeare and it changes his life He can only think and feel in Shakespearean language and begins to view the world through a semi romantic lens and only finds depravity when he walks into the new world It s everything he hates He has been termed the savage though he knows and understands the real meaning of the term even if those who call him such do not Naturally he becomes depressed and isolated in this new space a space that he cannot be a part of or accepted in not that he would want to be And I found him by far the most interesting and compelling character within the story because he is the only one to really look beyond the boundaries of his own experience and to find it wanting So this is a terribly important novel and I can t believe I have only just read it If Dont Try This At Home you haven t read it already Who Was Seabiscuit you know what My Big Book Of Sewing you have to do This isn t something to be missed It s a novel that made me think and imagine in a way a book hasn t done in uite some timeYou can connect with me on social media via My Linktree

characters Brave New World

Brave New World

Hological manipulation and classical conditioning that are combined to make a dystopian society which is challenged by only a single individual the story's protagoni. As a teenager I went through a period of reading a vast number of distopian novels probably all the teenage angst This is the one that has continued to haunt me however long after the my youthful cynicism has died it s death It s basically a book about the utopian ideal everyone s happy everyone has what they want and EVERYTHING is based on logical principles However there is something very rotten at the heart It s about how what we want isn t always what we should get It looks at how state sponsered happiness can entirely miss the point Perhaps most importantly it makes the case for individual freedom rather than authoritarian diktat It should be read hand in hand with Mill s Utilitarianism to get a good idea of the philosophy that inspired itIncidentally I gave this book to my boyfriend as a present for his 18th birthday a rather depressing gift I know At the time he wasn t particularly freaked out by it and said that it didn t hold the same level of dread as say 1984 or The Handmaid s Tale As he s got older however he s found the idea and frightening Six years later it has of a sting in the tail for him I don t know why this should be but I ll hazard a guess that as you get older you re idea of happiness becomes perhaps complex making the ideal of Brave New World even disturbing Echoes Of The Empire The Mixed Voices Of A Colonial Past youthful cynicism has died it s death It s basically a book about the utopian ideal everyone s happy everyone has what they want and EVERYTHING is based on logical principles However there is something very rotten at the heart It s about how what we want isn t always what we should get It looks at how state sponsered happiness can entirely miss the point Perhaps most importantly it makes the case for individual freedom rather than authoritarian diktat It should be read hand in hand with Mill s Utilitarianism to get a good idea of the philosophy that inspired itIncidentally I gave this book to my boyfriend as a present for his 18th birthday a rather depressing gift I know At the time he wasn t particularly freaked out by it and said that it didn t hold the same level of dread as say 1984 or The Handmaid s Tale As he s got older however he s found the idea and frightening Six The Archetype Of Initiation years later it has of a sting in the tail for him I don t know why this should be but I ll hazard a guess that as duplicity you get older Dont Try This At Home you re idea of happiness becomes perhaps complex making the ideal of Brave New World even disturbing

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Brave New World is a dystopian novel by English author Aldous Huxley written in 1931 and published in 1932 Largely set in a futuristic World State inhabited by genet. Aldous Huxley wrote Brave New World in 1932 That s almost eighty years ago but the book reads like it could have been written yesterday especially interesting to me was how Huxley was able to predict the future of both genetic engineering and the action blockbuster DamnI think I liked this one better than 1984 the book traditionally considered to be this one s counterpart Not really sure why this is but it s probably because this one has a clearer outsider character the Savage who can view the world Huxley created through his separate perspective In this light I will give the last word to Neil Postman who discussed the differences between Orwell and Huxley s views of the future What Orwell feared were those who would ban books What Huxley feared was that there would be no reason to ban a book for there would be no one who wanted to read one Orwell feared those who would deprive us information Huxley feared those who would give us so much that we would be reduced to passivity and egoism Orwell feared that the truth would be concealed from us Huxley feared the truth would be drowned in a sea of irrelevance Orwell feared we would become a captive culture Huxley feared we would become a trivial culture preoccupied with some euivalent of the feelies the orgy porgy and the centrifugal bumblepuppy As Huxley remarked in Brave New World revisited the civil libertarians and rationalists who are ever on the alert to oppose tyranny failed to take into account man s almost infinite appetite for distractions In Nineteen Eighty Four people are controlled by inflicting pain In Brave New World people are controlled by inflicting pleasure In short Orwell feared that what we hate will ruin us Huxley feared that what we love will ruin us