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दीवार में एक खिड़की रहती थी

The tin box in which Sonsi keeps her precious things But there is a magical place beyond the window which sustains Raghuvir Prasad's and Sonsi's spirit This window lived in a wa. Best thing about the book is its style of narration its language that deals with articulating subtle and sinuous often contradictory ways of human thought told through the innocuous characters of Raghuvar Prasad and his wife Sonasi The story has several moments that tickle you and perhaps bring you to chuckle over it as well The only thing I did not like about the book was its pretension of trying to be a regular novel of story where there was none At times the repetitiveness of plot begins to bore to the hilt If only author had still further reduced the size of an already short novella it might have had fared better In short an amazing narration style and innocuous characters make this book a worth read but overall book has the deficiency of overdoing the good thing and going nowhere with that Read it if you are a regular Hindi novel reader to enjoy its lyrical prose that is all to it

Summary Ç PDF, DOC, TXT, eBook or Kindle ePUB free ✓ Vinod Kumar Shukla

World of lower middle class neighbours among whom they belong Their possessions are meagre the single room barely accommodates their bed the water pot the kitchen utensils and. It made me laugh out loud several times touched my heart made me pine for the window and the world beyond it but left me unsatisfied in the endVinod Kumar Shukl have a style of writing like none other Some of those sentences are so much fun to read again and again His device of characters saying one thing and listening another is also very interesting There is no plot here This book is all slice of life and the craft of the author

Vinod Kumar Shukla ✓ 2 Summary

Sahitya Akademi Winner of 1999 Vinod Kumar Shukla's apparently slight novel reaches into the depth of feeling Raghuvir Prasad and his wife Sonsi have for one another and for the. Nothing much happens Fondly imagined and leisurely written this books borders on magical realism of Maruez or Rushdie There are seemingly nonsensical conversations magical worlds which are never explained and characters who disappear but it all seems plausible even obvious Sure that could happen in this town The author takes us to an almost Utopian world of a North Indian village where nothing much happens and in to the life of a newly married couple Wish one could stay back for a days in that gaon

  • Paperback
  • 170
  • दीवार में एक खिड़की रहती थी
  • Vinod Kumar Shukla
  • Hindi
  • 17 May 2019
  • null

About the Author: Vinod Kumar Shukla

Vinod Kumar Shukla born 1 January 1937 is a modern Hindi writer known for his surreal style that often borders on magic realism and sometimes move beyond it His works include the novels Naukar ki Kameez and Deewar Mein Ek Khirkee Rahati Thi A Window lived in a Wall which won the Sahitya Akademi Award for the best Hindi work in 1999His first collection of poems Lagbhag Jai Hind was published in 1971 Vah Aadmi Chala Gaya Naya Garam Coat Pehankar Vichar Ki Tarah was his second collection of poems published in 1981 by Sambhavna Prakashan Naukar Ki Kameez The Servant's Shirt was his first novel brought out in 1979 by the same publisher Per Par Kamra Room on the Tree a collection of short stories was brought out in 1988 and another collection of poems in 1992 Sab Kuch Hona Bacha RahegaVinod Kumar Shukla was a guest littérateur at the Nirala Srijanpeeth in AGRA from 1994 to 1996 during which he wrote two novels Khilega To Dekhenge and the refreshing Deewar Mein Ek Khirkee Rahati Thi The latter has been translated into English by Prof Satti Khanna of Duke University as A Window Lived in a Wall



8 thoughts on “दीवार में एक खिड़की रहती थी

  1. says:

    Having heard so much about the writings of the author,I had to read this acclaimed book. It’s nothing like what I have read: there’s Raghuvar Prasad who teaches mathematics to primary school children in a small town college who lives in a single rented room. He takes a jitney to the college and is on the verge of star

  2. says:

    Nothing much happens. Fondly imagined and leisurely written, this books borders on magical realism of Marquez or Rushdie. There are seemingly nonsensical conversations, magical worlds which are never explained and characters who disappear but it all seems plausible, even obvious. Sure that could happen in this town! The author takes us to an almost Utopian world of a North Indian village where nothing much happens and

  3. says:

    Simple village setting. A very poor teacher stretching ends to meet living in a small room with a big window.This is the story of the couple's f

  4. says:

    It made me laugh out loud several times, touched my heart, made me pine for the window and the world beyond it but left me unsatisfied in the end.Vinod Kumar Shukl have a style of writing like none other. Some of those sentences are so much fun to read again and again. His device of characters saying one thing and listening another is also ve

  5. says:

    I was quite intrigued by the title of the book, that’s why I picked up. It's originally written in Hindi, but I read the translated version. This book will take the reader to another world, provided the reader is ready to go. When I first started it, I was a bit sceptical as to where the story is going until I realised

  6. says:

    Best thing about the book is its style of narration, its language, that deals with articulating subtle and sinuous often contradictory ways of human thought , told through the innocuous characters of Raghuvar Prasad and his

  7. says:

    A simple story of a simple man, his simple wife and their simple life and in between all of this, their simple love story.Prose which is poetry than prose, there is an elephant to ferry our Raghuvar prasad to colllege and back, there is a magical window which is this lower middle class couple's passage (escape)

  8. says:

    This dreamy narrative of a newly married ambidextrous maths teacher proceeds with elephantine grace. There are meandering conversations – almost at cross purposes – as if the participants are tripping on LSD or cannabis. Try to figure out the symbolism of the elephant, unclaimed bicycles, the boy in the tree (akin to the cameo

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