[David Wootton] The Invention of Science – A New History of the Scientific Revolution [dressmaking Book] eBook – Kindle ePUB, eBook or Book Download

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A companion to such acclaimed works as The Age of Wonder A Clockwork Universe and Darwin’s Ghosts a groundbreaking examination of the greatest event in history the Scientific Revolution and how it came to change the way we understand ourselves and our worldWe live in a world transformed by scientific discovery Yet today science and its practitioners have come under political attack In this fascinating history spanning continents and centuries historian David Wootton offers a lively defense of science revealing why the Scienti. This is probably a very important book to read if you re a philosopher of science who thinks that the theories of phlogiston and evolution are of eual validity Of course those people do not exist This is clearly a failure of editing agenting and a triumph of misleading marketing This book is not at all a general reader s book about the scientific revolution and certainly not about the invention of science it is instead scholarly articles embedded in a polemic against postmodernists the book was apparently conceived in 1982 Others have written about the book s many structural flaws I will just note two intellectual flaws First Wootton opposes the sociology of science because they approach science sociologically without any regard for the truth claims of scientific theories Does he feel the same way about the sociology of religion I wonder To make my point clear sociologists study human interactions They do not care what those interactions are about and if they did they would be betraying the point of sociology Second Wootton s positive arguments are horrific To take the most obvious he claims that Columbus discovery of the Americas made science possible by introducing the very concept of discovery It was not possible to discover gravity in other words without the concept of discovery without that concept one could just go on adjusting already existing theories rather than taking account of new facts he also covers the invention of the idea of the fact Slight problem here Columbus discovery of the Americas was also the Americans discovery of Europe And yet science did not develop in the Americas until after the Europeans had really really really discovered it Why not Because concepts are useless in the absence of economic development political support and so on Science may rely on the concept of discovery grammatically Wootton loves him some Wittgenstein and is at pains to show that Wittgenstein was not a relativist but not historically There is nothing here about the importance of economic development for the development of science which is no failing in an academic article about the concept of discovery but a rather glaring one in a book about the scientific revolution A true disappointment Columbus did not of course discover the Americas They d been discovered for some time by you know the many civilizations spread out over the continent for a millenium or Wootton does not care

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The Invention of Science – A New History of the Scientific Revolution

S of the natural world challenged centuries of religious orthodoxy and ingrained superstitionFrom gunpowder technology the discovery of the new world movable type printing perspective painting and the telescope to the practice of conducting experiments the laws of nature and the concept of the fact Wotton shows how these discoveries codified into a social construct and a system of knowledge Ultimately he makes clear the link between scientific discovery and the rise of industrialization and the birth of the modern world we know. This book will look I trust realist to relativists and relativist to realists that is how it is meant to look The Invention of Science isn t an easy book to read Neither is it particularly difficult thanks to Wootten s felicitous prose But it does reuire a high degree of concentration as Wootten ranges both far and deep in his exploration of how science got its start His argument is intentionally provocative precise plainly stated and copiously supported The writing is lively witty even barbed ualities generally absent in scholarly texts I also appreciated Wootten s approach to the footnoteendnote conundrum references are saved for the endnotes to accommodate readers who want to hunt down sources but comments that amplify the argument are placed at the bottom of the page to keep the reader in the flow In addition he s placed a series of longer notes at the end of the book where his basic arguments are outlined with brio and ancillary textsIn Wootten s account science is essentially the triumph of experience over philosophy All the standard characters are there Galileo Kepler Boyle Newton but also an entertaining anarchic host of lesser known scientists mathematicians theologians and philosophes doctors and clergymen Wootten gives the standard accounts an interesting spin looking as much at the tools of thought as at the tools of discovery and invention telescopes prisms air pumps He investigates the history and meaning of words such as discovery invention facts experiments laws hypotheses and even ordinary and apparently obvious terms such as progress and common sense Another excellent review on this page found this procedure a problem I didn t I was fascinated although as I said at the start one needs a strong cup of coffee and plenty of uiet concentration to make it through a few of these chaptersThis is a book that fully lives up to its title I read it after reading Noam Chomsky s recent lectures as a kind of luxuriant deeply satisfying postscript but that was just to amuse myself

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Fic Revolution was truly the greatest event in our historyThe Invention of Science goes back five hundred years in time to chronicle this crucial transformation exploring the factors that led to its birth and the people who made it happen Wootton argues that the Scientific Revolution was actually five separate yet concurrent events that developed independently but came to intersect and create a new worldview Here are the brilliant iconoclasts Galileo Copernicus Brahe Newton and many curious minds from across Europe whose studie. another book I read across time and finished the last few pages in these two free days after the New Year dense reuiring effort both to understand the prose occasionally and to understand the arguments and one I wouldn t recommend for a novice reader in its subject The Scientific Revolution and the crucial change that happened in Western Europe gradually between 1500 and 1700 and most notably between 1600 and 1700 that led to the world of todayThere are always arguments whether there was a revolution what is science and so on but as the author points out if you look at the intellectual lifeworld view in 1500 1600 and 1700 the differences are striking and the fundamental uestions tackled in the book are what happened was it predetermined to happen or an accident that Newton Locke Leibniz Hooke and many others buildingrespondingarguing with earlier works by Descartes Galileo Copernicus and others and being able to freely or less and timely meet communicate share dispute happened to live and work in the same historical period how it happened etcNot a linear or events when who how but a full meditation on the subject also regarding it through the prism of current thinking and arguing with such in addition to presenting a panorama of the epochHighly recommended and worth persevering through the book


10 thoughts on “The Invention of Science – A New History of the Scientific Revolution

  1. says:

    This is a book with a simple argument to make that the scientific revolution was a real thing it definitely happened and it happened at a specific point in time namely ‘between 1572 when Tycho Brahe saw a nova and 1704 when Newton published his Opticks’ In that century and a half a staggering number of new truths about reality became u

  2. says:

    I was so looking forward to liking this book But in the end I did not really warm to it I do not say this lightly and it even takes me some courage to admit it Why so? Because the history of ideas is a subject close to my heart and I wrote a longish essay at university about the development of historiography in the 17th century That does not mean I am an expert on this subject far from it but it does mean that I researched some of

  3. says:

    This is probably a very important book to read if you're a philosopher of science who thinks that the theories of phlogist

  4. says:

    another book I read across time and finished the last few pages in these two free days after the New Year dense reuiring effort both to understand the prose occasionally and to understand the arguments and one I wouldn't recommend for a novice

  5. says:

    Simply one of the best treatments of the history and philosophy of science I've read An exploration of how science developed what tools and cultural conditions made it possible and how and why it has progressed It is also presents a v

  6. says:

    This book defends the traditional idea of the scientific revolution as a break in Western history that so radical that it introduced the idea of progress disenchanted the world created a worldview based on the idea that knowledge was not based on authority but objective fact In other words it was the foundation of the mindset of modern peop

  7. says:

    This is no lightweight book both literally and metaphorically It packs in nearly 600 pages of decidedly small print and manages to assign about 10 per cent of these simply to deciding what is meant by a 'scientific revolution' the subtitle is 'a new history of the scientific revolution' While warning of the importance of being aware of the change in meaning of some terms the author successfully demolishes the arguments of those w

  8. says:

    This book will look I trust realist to relativists and relativist to realists that is how it is meant to look The Invention of Science isn't an easy book to read Neither is it particularly difficult thanks to Wootten's felicitous prose But it does reuire a high degree of concentration as Wootten ranges both far and deep in his exploration of how science got its start His argument is intentionally provocative precise p

  9. says:

    The author did a good job by laying out the historic events that make The Scientific Revolution possible He did detailed language evolution of what he called 'intellectual tools' of modern science for example Facts Discovery Hypothesis Theory Laws of Nature etc I enjoyed most of language details and comparisons French Italian lati

  10. says:

    HIGHLY recommended for science nerdsThis is a sweeping summary very well sourced and noted of the basic idea repercussions of the S